Happening CLT: Carolina Art Crush – Hagit Barkai

Hagit Barkai is an artist and professor, somewhat new to the Charlotte area. Her work in incredibly beautiful and intriguing, and we’re so glad she’s part of our community.
HappeningsCLT: Describe yourself in three words.
Hagit Barkai: Sign without meaning. There is a line that stayed with me from a Heidegger book I read called What Is Called Thinking. He mentioned that Hoelderlin said “we are a sign that is not read.” I think about it as a sign that carries no fixed meaning and it makes me laugh

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Buried Commentaries: Installation at Caldwell Arts Council.

The installation Buried Commentaries is a meditation on hiding. Hiding people. Hiding places. Hiding acts. Hiding what is happening in representations, in ceremonies, in ideologies, in an identity and morphing what happened into new stories, new images.

The installation includes six upright paintings with imagery from staged photo performances representing stories ranging from private to archetypical, and 30 smaller paintings of places in which hiding occurs through normalization, abandonment and memorials.

Among the places I visited are Camp Les Milles in south of France before, during and after its reconstruction into a memorial museum, museums and outdoor memorials in Jerusalem and Berlin, and checkpoints in the Israeli occupied West Bank in Palestinian territories, The photo performances were done with actors, dancers, performance artists, models, and friends in various locations including Houston Texas, Tel Aviv Israel, Berlin Germany and Brignole France.

 

Caldwell Arts Council

The Caldwell Arts Council is pleased to announce the August exhibit: “BODY WORKS” featuring figure artwork by Davidson College Assistant Art Professor Hagit Barkai in the main floor galleries.  Figure artists featured in the upstairs gallery are: Bobbi Miller (Moran Wyoming), Dan Smith (Hickory NC), Jean Cauthen (Mint Hill NC), Kate Worm (Taylorsville NC), Kenny Walker (Lawndale NC), and Steve Brooks (Hickory NC).

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"Painting in-sights" by Simone Osthoff

Looking back at us with a mixture of intent, fear, and defiance, Hagit Barkai’s paintings increasingly implicate viewers in the process of seeing. Her haunting images do not smooth over disruption and anxiety. Instead, they open the abyss between knowledge and unintelligibility. 

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Charlotte, NC Creative Loafing, Nov 8 2011

A viewing of Hagit Barkai’s It Looks Something Like This exhibit at Davidson College’s Van Every Gallery conjures a sense of uneasiness. The mostly nude figures — with faces somewhat blurred — convey feelings of vulnerability, apprehensiveness and disarray through the canvasses they embody.A viewing of Hagit Barkai’s It Looks Something Like This exhibit at Davidson College’s Van Every Gallery conjures a sense of uneasiness. The mostly nude figures — with faces somewhat blurred — convey feelings of vulnerability...

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New art exhibit comments on body-image, gender and victimhood

Art faculty, Hagit Barkai, opened "It Looks Something Like This," an exhibit of evocative figurative paintings on Thursday, November 3, 2011. A crowd of students, faculty and art enthusiasts gathered in the Katherine and Tom Belk Visual Arts Center (VAC) to celebrate as Barkai debuted her work to the Davidson community.

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Resistance Press Release

Good painting is always sincere. Great art is always honest, and artists arrive at greatness by channeling a burning desire. They take what is known and what is felt, and place it before us for our consideration so that we may stop a moment to think and feel a little more. Their original 

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Resistance Press Release

Hagit Barkai: "Resistance"

opening reception Saturday June 4, 6 to 9 PM

exhibition runs through June 25, 2011

please note: new gallery hours Wed. Thurs, Fri. & Sat. Noon to 6 PM

Nau-haus Art, 223 E. 11th St. Houston TX, 77008

contact: Dan Allison dan@nau-haus.com

gallery phone: 281-615-4148

www.nau-haus.com

Good painting is always sincere. Great art is always honest, and artists arrive at greatness by channeling a burning desire. They take what is known and what is felt, and place it before us for our consideration so that we may stop a moment to think and feel a little more. Their original mark is as singular as a fingerprint and needs no comparison to the others for any reason other than historical reference. Originality is never the intent, but rather the result when the work has evolved from the inside out, from the heart of the individual and the burning desire that leads them.

We find Hagit Barkai and the evidence of her journey nearer the beginning than the end, but can still see an evolution from her earlier body of work.  Barkai's work is truthful and smart. She reminds us that we are not always pretty but sometimes just vulnerable, unaware and exposed. " I construct a space that is inhabitant by lives that are not fully there anymore, lives that are not fully there yet, and lives that are there but for one reason or another are not considered to be there."  We need smart artists to challenge our preconceptions so that we might overcome the prejudice of our perspective and allow ourselves the happiness that comes from a wider view.  Hagit Barkai demonstrates all the skill and desire she needs to share her vision, and the intelligence, honesty and heart to see it all. (view complete essay "Elegance and the Incomplete Idea" at link below)

                                                                                                                         DMA - Nau-haus 2011

read more about Hagit Barkai, reviews, images, essays, and biography here: http://www.texascollaborative.com/HagitBarkaiHTMLPage.html